For Healthcare Professionals Outside the US

Repeatedly transfused patients are at risk for iron overload1

 
PATIENT RISK

Chronic iron overload often occurs in patients with transfusion-dependent anemias2

  • Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)
  • Thalassemia
  • Sickle cell disease



PRBC, packed red blood cells.

The human body has no natural way to actively remove excess iron.1
Iron chelation therapy is needed to remove excess iron caused by transfusions.1

 
EFFECTS OF IRON OVERLOAD

Inadequately controlled iron overload can result in serious consequences1

Iron toxicity in patients with chronic iron overload may lead to organ damage.3,4

 
ADHERENCE CHALLENGES

Many patients with chronic iron overload may have difficulty taking iron chelation therapy regularly and at their prescribed doses5,6*

aIncludes EXJADE® (deferasirox) dispersible tablets for oral suspension, desferrioxamine intramuscular injections, and desferrioxamine subcutaneous infusions.

aPrior to the availability of EXJADE® (deferasirox) film-coated tablets.

PATIENT-SPECIFIED FEATURES FOR GREATER CHRONIC THERAPY ADHERENCE7,8
a Fewer pills/tablets and steps, especially for pediatric and adolescent patients
a Less time being lost as a result of therapy preparation and administration
a Option to take with food
a Minimized pain and adverse events

*Based on studies with MDS and thalassemia patients.

EXJADE film-coated tablets makes it convenient for patients to take and stay on their iron chelation therapy.

References

Please note: In some countries, EXJADE film-coated tablets is available as JADENU® (deferasirox) tablets.